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24 April 2014
"What’s the most important thing you’ve ever learned?"

"That when you pursue your dreams, you have to be sure they are really your own dreams. As a young person you may have dreams influenced by a lot of external factors. You should be receptive to those dreams changing as you get to know yourself better and discover what you are truly passionate about."

"How did you learn this?"

"I’ve always pursued my passions. I studied what I loved and had my entire career mapped out in my head. I thought I had it all worked out. I had a 30 year plan! But when I hit the working world and got my so called ‘dream job’ I had the terrifying realization that I didn’t quite enjoy it. It horrified me! I was in the arts, I was living my dream but I was still unhappy. 

Then by chance I started doing some project management work and discovered that I enjoyed it and was good in it. But I had so much guilt - I felt like an artist who ‘copped out’. It took me a while to accept that I didn’t need to create art or new content. I enjoyed arts management and creating platforms for people to share their art and I have now been spending the last year actively pursuing that. It’s been a cool journey of growth to think that for the longest time I focused on being an artist but have now realised I am way more passionate about managing it. “

"What’s the most important thing you’ve ever learned?"

"That when you pursue your dreams, you have to be sure they are really your own dreams. As a young person you may have dreams influenced by a lot of external factors. You should be receptive to those dreams changing as you get to know yourself better and discover what you are truly passionate about."

"How did you learn this?"

"I’ve always pursued my passions. I studied what I loved and had my entire career mapped out in my head. I thought I had it all worked out. I had a 30 year plan! But when I hit the working world and got my so called ‘dream job’ I had the terrifying realization that I didn’t quite enjoy it. It horrified me! I was in the arts, I was living my dream but I was still unhappy.

Then by chance I started doing some project management work and discovered that I enjoyed it and was good in it. But I had so much guilt - I felt like an artist who ‘copped out’. It took me a while to accept that I didn’t need to create art or new content. I enjoyed arts management and creating platforms for people to share their art and I have now been spending the last year actively pursuing that. It’s been a cool journey of growth to think that for the longest time I focused on being an artist but have now realised I am way more passionate about managing it. “

20 April 2014


“The hardest part was telling my mother. I started by leaving my bottles of medicine around in the hopes she would ask me. And she did. But every time I lied about it. I guess I freaked out. I was not ready to tell her. This went on for 6 months and she asked me about it four or five times. Finally I knew I had to just say it.

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15 April 2014
"Whenever an old provision shop or eating house closes down, you hear a lot of complaints online. But I wonder how many of these people have a relationship with the place that is closing? It’s pointless being a keyboard warrior if you never give the shop any business and just walk past on your way to buy a $5 latte. That drives me crazy. People should try to get more involved in their communities and take an interest in how urban space is developing around them instead of just ranting online."
“So how have you been active in your community?”
“I was part of the group that set up the We Love Hua Bee page and actively worked to keep it from closing. A white knight did come in and we are really happy how that turned out. So now I’m taking on a more ambitious project - organising an entire music festival, “Musicity”, which will take place in different locations around Tiong Bahru. It’s about music but also about spoken word and place. When I started I anticipated possible comments ‘oh it’s just one more hipster addition to Tiong Bahru’ but actually the response has been fantastic. There is definitely a hunger for people to connect with something that is home grown and reflects our own experience.”

"Whenever an old provision shop or eating house closes down, you hear a lot of complaints online. But I wonder how many of these people have a relationship with the place that is closing? It’s pointless being a keyboard warrior if you never give the shop any business and just walk past on your way to buy a $5 latte. That drives me crazy. People should try to get more involved in their communities and take an interest in how urban space is developing around them instead of just ranting online."

“So how have you been active in your community?”

“I was part of the group that set up the We Love Hua Bee page and actively worked to keep it from closing. A white knight did come in and we are really happy how that turned out. So now I’m taking on a more ambitious project - organising an entire music festival, “Musicity”, which will take place in different locations around Tiong Bahru. It’s about music but also about spoken word and place. When I started I anticipated possible comments ‘oh it’s just one more hipster addition to Tiong Bahru’ but actually the response has been fantastic. There is definitely a hunger for people to connect with something that is home grown and reflects our own experience.”

13 April 2014
Friend and Sister

"Sylvia was a bubbly person - full of life and love for all the people and animals around her. She also felt strongly about the environment and even said many times ‘When I go, I want to be cremated in a paper coffin. No wood. Don’t kill any trees for me.’ 

We always thought that day would come when she was old and gray. But suddenly at 49, after a stroke, she left us. It seemed like it would be impossible to fulfill this odd wish but, amazingly, when we Googled it we found there was a local professor that made exactly the kind of eco-coffins we were looking for. 

At first it seemed like a plain, sad shoebox of a thing, but then something wondrous happened. Everyone started writing messages of love and pasting it on the box. Love and life just overflowed. The wake became a celebration of her life. Even the kids could participate… drawing pictures of the cats Syl’s loved so much or simple farewells. It was very touching for friends and family members to read these messages and see how much she was loved. It was such an enormous comfort in a time of loss. And Dr. Ng with his unusual cardboard caskets made it possible. We are really grateful. “


—-

FYI you can reach Dr. Ng here: http://bit.ly/eco-ng
Close up of coffin: http://bit.ly/1oSls92
BTW - the average coffin uses 40-120kg of wood. Eco-coffins use mostly recycled material.

Friend and Sister

"Sylvia was a bubbly person - full of life and love for all the people and animals around her. She also felt strongly about the environment and even said many times ‘When I go, I want to be cremated in a paper coffin. No wood. Don’t kill any trees for me.’

We always thought that day would come when she was old and gray. But suddenly at 49, after a stroke, she left us. It seemed like it would be impossible to fulfill this odd wish but, amazingly, when we Googled it we found there was a local professor that made exactly the kind of eco-coffins we were looking for.

At first it seemed like a plain, sad shoebox of a thing, but then something wondrous happened. Everyone started writing messages of love and pasting it on the box. Love and life just overflowed. The wake became a celebration of her life. Even the kids could participate… drawing pictures of the cats Syl’s loved so much or simple farewells. It was very touching for friends and family members to read these messages and see how much she was loved. It was such an enormous comfort in a time of loss. And Dr. Ng with his unusual cardboard caskets made it possible. We are really grateful. “


—-

FYI you can reach Dr. Ng here: http://bit.ly/eco-ng
Close up of coffin: http://bit.ly/1oSls92
BTW - the average coffin uses 40-120kg of wood. Eco-coffins use mostly recycled material.

10 April 2014
"My job is to sit here and count the number of cars that come into the bus lane."

"What do they do with the data?"

"No idea. I just know you’re NOT supposed to drive in the bus lane."

The good news: your traffic infringements are keeping young people employed.

"My job is to sit here and count the number of cars that come into the bus lane."

"What do they do with the data?"

"No idea. I just know you’re NOT supposed to drive in the bus lane."

The good news: your traffic infringements are keeping young people employed.

7 April 2014
"Are you guys twins?"

"No. We’re dating."

"Are you guys twins?"

"No. We’re dating."

3 April 2014
"She’s my Singapore-mother. She helped me through very difficult times."

"She’s my Singapore-mother. She helped me through very difficult times."

31 March 2014

"I first came to Singapore 30 years ago after I was tricked into marriage. I was a teenager and a boy from my village who really liked me kept charming my parents with presents and kind words. I wasn’t interested but eventually they agreed to have me go over to meet his parents for dinner. I still remember the last thing they said to him as we went off to dinner was,

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28 March 2014
"What advice do you have for people?"

"Drink Guinness"

"What advice do you have for people?"

"Drink Guinness"

27 March 2014

Therese is 100 years old. So what’s the secret to longevity?

"I’ve loved sports my whole life. I played everything. I was even on Singapore’s first girls hockey team. People looked down on me for being such a tomboy when I was young. But that never stopped me."

"Well it paid off. You have great legs for a 100 year old!"

With a wry grin she pretends to expose a bit more leg. The entire rooms erupts in horror, “Gran! OMG you can’t

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27 March 2014
"When I was younger and would take a girl out on a date, I’d always pray she wouldn’t order the lobster. I just couldn’t afford it. But now, I’m adult with a career and can afford any food I want. But the irony is I can’t eat it. At my age, everything is bad for you. You have to watch everything you eat. Sigh."

"When I was younger and would take a girl out on a date, I’d always pray she wouldn’t order the lobster. I just couldn’t afford it. But now, I’m adult with a career and can afford any food I want. But the irony is I can’t eat it. At my age, everything is bad for you. You have to watch everything you eat. Sigh."

17 March 2014
"I only brought two of these books today. I have six more at home. They’re pictures of all the cats I have sterilized. I have my CPF and I downgraded so I have savings. I’ve worked out that if I live simply, I can afford to sterilize 4 cats per week. It’s quite expensive - you have to pay for the surgery, the transport and you have to pay boarding for 3-7 days while they heal. I do what I can. Do you know that they cull 5000 cats a year? It breaks my heart."

"I only brought two of these books today. I have six more at home. They’re pictures of all the cats I have sterilized. I have my CPF and I downgraded so I have savings. I’ve worked out that if I live simply, I can afford to sterilize 4 cats per week. It’s quite expensive - you have to pay for the surgery, the transport and you have to pay boarding for 3-7 days while they heal. I do what I can. Do you know that they cull 5000 cats a year? It breaks my heart."

17 March 2014
"Back in the 70s I was in the merchant navy working on a Singapore flag ship in The Great Lakes in Canada. One day I wrote my name and mailing address on a ball and threw it in the water. It was found by a girl who wrote me back and we became penpals. After some time I went to visit her. She lived outside Trois Rivieres which is a very ulu part of Quebec. Finding the place was a real adventure. But when we finally met, we couldn’t really speak to each other. She could hardly speak English and I couldn’t speak French. It broke the spell. We tried to keep writing but eventually lost touch."

"Back in the 70s I was in the merchant navy working on a Singapore flag ship in The Great Lakes in Canada. One day I wrote my name and mailing address on a ball and threw it in the water. It was found by a girl who wrote me back and we became penpals. After some time I went to visit her. She lived outside Trois Rivieres which is a very ulu part of Quebec. Finding the place was a real adventure. But when we finally met, we couldn’t really speak to each other. She could hardly speak English and I couldn’t speak French. It broke the spell. We tried to keep writing but eventually lost touch."

15 March 2014

"Hi there! My name is Theo. I’m 12 years old. And today I was invited to share my story.

I guess it all started when I was a kid. I wasn’t like other “normal boys” - I didn’t watch Superman or Spiderman or Power Rangers; I didn’t play football in the playground I didn’t like watching

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12 March 2014


“When I was 7 I was really skinny. Everyone on my father’s side is quite thin so it’s probably genetic. But relatives kept saying I needed to put on weight. So my parents put me on some drug that made me hungry all the time. It also made me tired. I went from being a pretty active kid to a pretty lethargic one. But it did get me to put on weight… and more and more. I was only on the drug for a year, but

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